June (also May) Book Haul(s)

I really can’t seem to help it when it comes to books.

This contains a few books I bought in May as well.

J. R. R. Tolkien in Beren and Lúthien, 201732708664

“Painstakingly restored from Tolkien’s manuscripts and presented for the first time as a fully continuous and standalone story, the epic tale of Beren and Lúthien will reunite fans of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings with Elves and Men, Dwarves and Orcs and the rich landscape and creatures unique to Tolkien’s Middle-earth. The tale of Beren and Lúthien was, or became, an essential element in the evolution of The Silmarillion, the myths and legends of the First Age of the World conceived by J.R.R. Tolkien. Returning from France and the battle of the Somme at the end of 1916, he wrote the tale in the following year.

Essential to the story, and never changed, is the fate that shadowed the love of Beren and Lúthien: for Beren was a mortal man, but Lúthien was an immortal Elf. Her father, a great Elvish lord, in deep opposition to Beren, imposed on him an impossible task that he must perform before he might wed Lúthien. This is the kernel of the legend; and it leads to the supremely heroic attempt of Beren and Lúthien together to rob the greatest of all evil beings, Melkor, called Morgoth, the Black Enemy, of a Silmaril.

In this book Christopher Tolkien has attempted to extract the story of Beren and Lúthien from the comprehensive work in which it was embedded; but that story was itself changing as it developed new associations within the larger history. To show something of the process whereby this legend of Middle-earth evolved over the years, he has told the story in his father’s own words by giving, first, its original form, and then passages in prose and verse from later texts that illustrate the narrative as it changed. Presented together for the first time, they reveal aspects of the story, both in event and in narrative immediacy, that were afterwards lost.”

My family is obsessed with Tolkien.  My aunt wrote her college thesis on Tolkien’s poetry and my mom reads the Lord of the Rings trilogy at least twice a year (she’s basically an expert and can answer any question about the series).  I was raised on Tolkien (and C. S. Lewis) so these books and their authors hold a special place in my heart.

As soon as I found out that the story of Beren and Lúthien was coming out I knew that I had to get it for my mom (Barnes and Nobel yo).  This is the first time the story has been told directly and I cannot wait to read it when my mom has finished.

V. E. Schwab in A Darker Shade of Magic, 201522055262

“Kell is one of the last Antari—magicians with a rare, coveted ability to travel between parallel Londons; Red, Grey, White, and, once upon a time, Black.

Kell was raised in Arnes—Red London—and officially serves the Maresh Empire as an ambassador, traveling between the frequent bloody regime changes in White London and the court of George III in the dullest of Londons, the one without any magic left to see.

Unofficially, Kell is a smuggler, servicing people willing to pay for even the smallest glimpses of a world they’ll never see. It’s a defiant hobby with dangerous consequences, which Kell is now seeing firsthand.

After an exchange goes awry, Kell escapes to Grey London and runs into Delilah Bard, a cut-purse with lofty aspirations. She first robs him, then saves him from a deadly enemy, and finally forces Kell to spirit her to another world for a proper adventure.

Now perilous magic is afoot, and treachery lurks at every turn. To save all of the worlds, they’ll first need to stay alive.”

Found this one Barnes and Nobel while i was browsing around.  I thought it looked like fun, and here we are.  This is the first book in a series.

Kerby Rosanes in Mythomorphia: An Extreme Coloring and Search Challenge, 2017

31247639I mean, it’s a colouring book.  ‘Nuff said.

.

..

….

…..

……

Ronlyn Domingue in Keeper of Tales Trilogy Book One: The Mapmaker’s War, 2013

15802506“This will be the map of your heart, old woman. 

In an ancient time, in a faraway land, a young woman named Aoife is allowed a rare apprentice/ship to become her kingdom’s mapmaker, tasked with charting the entire domain. Traveling beyond its borders, she finds a secretive people who live in peace, among great wealth. They claim to protect a mythic treasure, one connected to the creation of the world. When Aoife reports their existence to her kingdom, the community is targeted as a threat. Attempting to warn them of imminent danger, Aoife is exiled for treason and finds refuge among the very people who had been declared her enemy. With them, she begins a new life surrounded by kindness, equality, and cooperation. But within herself, Aoife has no peace. She cannot share the grief she feels for the home and children she left behind. She cannot bear the warrior scars of the man she comes to love. And when she gives birth to their gifted daughter, Aoife cannot avoid what the child forces her to confront about her past and its truth. On this most important of journeys, there is no map to guide her. In this tale, her autobiography; Aoife reveals her pain and joy, and ultimately her transformation.”

Picked this up at B&N.

Guy Gavriel Kay in The Fionavar Tapestry Book One: The Summer Tree, 1984 and The Fionavar Tapestry Book Three: The Darkest Road, 1986104086.jpg

“Five men and women find themselves flung into the magical land of Fionavar, First of all Worlds. They have been called there by the mage Loren Silvercloak, and quickly find themselves drawn into the complex tapestry of events. For Kim, Paul, Kevin, Jennifer and Dave all have their own part to play in the coming battle against the forces of evil led by the fallen god Rakoth Maugrim and his dark hordes.

Guy Gavriel Kay’s classic epic fantasy plays out on a truly grand scale, and has already been delighting fans of imaginative fiction for twenty years.”

I found this (and the third book) at a bargain bookstore and thought the story sounded interesting.  Also, very affordable x33

Margaret Weis & Tracy Hickman in Dragonships of Vindras Book Three: Rage of the Dragon, 201212160923

I got this book for a dollar at the bargain bookstore.  A DOLLAR, SON!  I don’t own the first two, but this is Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman we are talking about and I’ll read just about anything they write.  I am also in the process of reading the first book in the series, Bones of the Dragon, which I will eventually review whenever I finish reading it (it’s so overdue at the library).  I wont be putting the story summary because it gives away some things from the previous two books.  No spoilers here!  I am really looking forward to continuing this series.

Kevin J. Anderson in The Key to Creation, 2011

9302745So this book here.  Wow.  I also grabbed this one for a dollar and it is also the third in a series.  I read the first book, The Edge of the World, ages ago.  It is this massive, gorgeous world whose characters have interwoven stories and there was even an album that went along with the story.  Again, I wont be posting the summary because I don’t want to give away anything from the previous books.  Now that I’ve found this one, I will have to re-read The Edge of the World meaning there will probably be a review of this series in the future.  This find has reminded me of Terra Incognita, and I am itching to read these books.

 

I also picked up the second volumes of The Dark Tower and The Girl from the Other Side.  I have yet to actually read the first volumes, but that will happen eventually, probably.  One day.

Anyway, these are the books that have joined my collection during the months of May and June.  Hopefully I get around to reading some of these soon.  I’ve got quite the list to work through!

Thanks for being here!

-Hatchet x33

[Synopses and book covers from Goodreads.com | Featured Image from Pexels.com]

 

 

‘Book Club’: Horus Rising Part 3 Ch. 3-4 FINAL

If you’re new to the book club, check out the first post in the series ‘Book Club’: Horus Rising Ch. 1-3.

You can find the previous post HERE.

Guys.

Shit.

Goes.

Down.

It’s been a month since I’ve read this…so let’s see how this goes!

HORUS is pretty annoyed that they haven’t been able to come to terms with the interex.  HORUS is intent on peacefully winning them over, but he’s about the only one.  However a meeting is arranged and he optimistically hopes for peace.  Both HORUS and Jeptha Naud (do they mean Judd Nelson?) have their warriors walk simultaneous patrols around the building.

While wandering the house Loken comes across an old book titled A Marvelous Historie of Eevil subtitle Being a warninge to Man Kind on the Abuses of Sorcerie and the Seduction of the Daemon.  WHY, Abnett.  Why must you spell this way.  Regardless of spelling, Mithras Tull sees Loken looking at the book and they strike up a conversation about deamons and magic and such.  Loken of course holds staunchly to his view of “supernatural things do not exist”, while Tull takes the whole matter very seriously.  The subject of Chaos (or Kaos) comes up and Tull is shocked at Loken’s lack of knowldege, interest, concern, fear of Chaos.  He explains that the interex understands Chaos to be an evil force that makes men turn on each other and manifests as “brutal, rapacious, warlike”, and the fact that the Astartes are led by a Warmaster scares the interex.  Loken somehow believes his people to be none of those things.  Even more surprising is that Tull agrees.

For all of two seconds.

Tull receives some message that turns him against Loken.  Loken refuses to surrender and a fight ensues.  Loken is unwilling to kill Tull, so he merely chops his arm off.  The resulting battle between interex and Astartes produces heavy casualties on both sides.  Loken runs into two Astartes in the hall and one is quickly felled by arrows.  The bows that the soldiers had laughed at previously prove to be deadly, shearing through the Astarte’s plate as if it were butter. Loken then runs into Tarik and his men, retreating with HORUS.

We find that someone has gone and murdered some guards and stolen something from the museum holding all the ‘dwarf’ artifacts and then set the place on fire.  Well that wasn’t very nice.

Tarik and Loken try to convince HORUS that they have to leave now, but HORUS commands them to take him to the Hall of Devices to see what is going on.  Nothing useful happens and HORUS and his entourage are surrounded by interex fighters.  In a last attempt at peace, HORUS asks to see Judd Nelson but is answered with arrows.  So they fight.  HORUS and his men drive the interex back to the street and are promptly surrounded.  This is the last stand.  There is no hope…

Chapter 4 starts with an exchange between Sadie and Loken after the battle.  So I guess they made it.

Lowercase Horus arrived to rescue HORUS and all Imperial soldiers.  They kill a lot of interex dudes.  Like, it’s terrible.

HORUS changes the name of the Luna Wolves to the Sons of Horus.  Everyone approves.  Ig drinks his approval and Keeler worships her shrine to the Emperor of Mankind.

And then we find out that Erebus THAT BLEEP BLEEP EREBUS STOLE THE THING FROM THE THING!  You butt-face!  Wait.  Who is Erebus?  Seriously.  Who is he?  The Dramatis Personae at the beginning of the book says he is the Chaplain, but has he been mentioned before?  I don’t think so?  I don’t know?  ARGH I’M SO CONFUSED.

Well that was Horus Rising.  I can’t say I liked it, but I didn’t hate all of it.  I liked the second half of Part 1, but the rest was…eh.  I don’t know if it was the writing, the story, the characters, or the crushing obligation to blog the whole book.  But we’ve finished!  It’s finally over!  Hopefully all my bad jokes paid off and you look forward to next summer’s book club (which will hopefully only last a summer) despite the deterioration of professionalism as the posts went on.  I am planning on reading False Gods, the sequal to Horus Rising written by Graham McNeill to give the series a fair chance, with the goal of writing a single review of that book whenever the time comes.

This has been the first iteration of Hatchet’s Summer Book Club.

Thanks for being here! ❤

‘Book Club’: Horus Rising Part 3 Ch. 1-2: Space Australia, Museum of Death

Welcome back to Hatchet’s Summer Book Club!  If you’re new, check out the first post in the series ‘Book Club’: Horus Rising Ch. 1-3.

You can find the previous post HERE and the next post HERE (whenever that happens).

Part 3 Chapter 1 introduces us to the interex, a human collection(?).  The Imperium peacefully become the interex’s guests…FOR NOW (duh duh duuuuuuuuuhhhhhhh). I’m beginning to see how the series got it’s title.

Most people, including Eidolon, Maloghurst, Sedirae, Targost, and Goshen and Raldoron (those last two are Blood Angels) want to destroy the interex because they don’t want the Imperium to co-exist the with anything, and the interex is too compassionate.  According to them, the differences between the Imperium and the interex are so irreconcilable that war is the only possible course of action.  Good guy HORUS would prefer peace.

HORUS and the Mournival meet to discuss the situation.  Abaddon is quite belligerent, unable to understand how his Warmaster could desire peace with and almost admire the interex.  The argument gets so heated, HORUS kicks him out of the meeting.  Tarik follows him to diffuse the situation.  HORUS then tells lowercase Horus and Loken about his father-son relationship with the Emperor, using the zodiac to explain his desire for peace.

The Emperor had given HORUS an astrology book.  HORUS memorized the 20 zodiacs and when asked, said his favourites were Leos, Skorpos, Tauromach, and Arbitos (Leo, Scorpio, Taurus, and Virgo?).  The Emperor was impressed but dissapointed that HORUS had not chosen Sagittary, as he was to become the Emperor’s Warmaster.  However, HORUS admires the interex for their compassion and capacity to integrate other species into their society.  Lowercase Horus is having none of it.  HORUS also said the Emperor told him ‘Make no mistakes, and the stars will be ours” (or thereabouts).  He thinks he as made two mistakes (only tow?!?!  Wow, HORUS is a saint), and does not want to rush into things with the interex.

The interex have developed a musical way to communicate with other species called the aria.  It is very much like music, but so complexly mathematical that only a plebeian would mistake it for music.

Music is math people.

We then get a description of the interex envoy sent to meet HORUS.  Despite being human, these people sound much more elf like or some other humanoid alien (although we do have women with helmet shaped heads so….).  They are tall, about the same height as the Astartes, but very slender with bat ears…  I’m not kidding.  It is literally printed on the page that humans evolved (and surgically created) bat ears.  There are men who play the aria dressed in robes, and the soldiers are dressed in form fitting armour, so light you could jump on a horse!  (Please don’t jump on horses, they are extremely fragile).  With these hooman things, come what could only be described as space dwarves.  Short, broad, and stony features.  These dwarf guys are an alien species the interex have absorbed into their culture (lowercase Horus is not impressed).

Daith Shehn, envoy for the interex, and HORUS meet to discuss stuff.  They start with formalities and Daith is excited to learn that the interex has found lost cousins.  HORUS is equally excited.  They compare military forces, with Daith showing concern for how prepared and eager the Imperium is for war.  The interex has no love of war and would rather co-exist with the aliens they come across.  The spider-mechs are an exception, as the interex found no way to communicate with them, even using the aria.  They defeated the spider-mechs in war and placed the remaining creatures onto Murder, or Urisarach as they call it, where they could live in peace with no way to bother anyone else.  HORUS apologizes for ruining their penal colony.

Chapter 2 sees a rather shouty discussion between the Mournival about the interex, and more specifically about HORUS’ apology.  Abaddon is the only one who is truly upset, the others having full trust in HORUS no matter what he says.  There has also been a heavy demand on the Warmaster’s time as he’s been gone for seven months now.  The envoys continue until it is decided that HORUS and an entourage will be received at an outpost for more negotiations.

Erebus is introduced, so I can only assume this character will be somewhat important.  He selflessly puts off his own interests to help relieve some of HORUS’s stress, also intentionally strengthening relationships with the Mournival.  They also have sparring matches against each other, with Tarik’s new best friends Saul and also Lucius is there.  Lucius insists on sparring against everyone, including Loken.  Loken does not want to hurt Lucius’ ego, which is probably impossible.  So Loken punches him in the face.  It is quite glorious.

HORUS and his Imperial party are received at the interex homeworld.  Accompanying the terrifying horse-faced Astartes are the Remembrancers, which HORUS hopes will prove to the interex that the Imperium of Man is not obsessed with war (even though they totes are).  The Imperial party is shown around the city, and one of the most interesting things that they see is a museum full of alien weapons and technology.  Lowercase Horus and Abbadon think they are being mocked by this show of weapons. It is explained that these weapons are held in a museum because the technology is so advanced and they are incredibly dangerous.  Sindermann (remember that guy?) asks what could be so dangerous about a knife.  The tiny alien dwarves have a way of creating sentient weapons.  Sindermann jokingly suggests that a curse is placed on the weapon, and the interex, very seriously, agrees.

This is telling of things to come.

This has been Hatchet’s Summer Book Club, thanks for being here! x33

[Pict]

‘Book Club’: Horus Rising Part 2 Ch. 6 and 7: Dogfights and War

We are back with a new post, and a new look for the new year.  (Let me know what you think of the new theme, can’t decide if I like it or not).

If you’re new to the book club, check out the first post in the series ‘Book Club’: Horus Rising Ch. 1-3.

You can find the previous post HERE and the next post HERE (whenever that happens).

(Editor’s note: although Tarvitz has been mentioned by name more often than Tarik (probably), Torgaddon is too much of a pain to type over and over again so I’m going to retcon all uses of Tarvitz to Saul.)

Part 2 Chapter 6 sees the action return to Murder, Saul and Co. being rescued by Tarik.  While Saul and Eidolon are appreciative, Eidolon is not appreciative (yes, the wording is intentional).  They waste no time insulting each other, Eidolon attacking Tarik’s status as a Luna Wolf (really not sure how he thought that was an insult) and Tarik attacking Eidolon’s incompetence as a commander (which is valid).  So Tarik 1, Eidolon 0.

Tarik has Saul and his remaining men assist him in fending off the possible next wave of Spider-Mecha-dealys.  Lucius wants to kill Tarik for his insolence and calls him a dog while Saul says he quite likes dogs.  I think he has a crush.  Tarik and Eidolon get in another argument about what to do next.  Tarik manages to extract himself from the conversation and inquires of Saul how he can stand to take orders from Eidolon.  Saul simply states that Eidolon is his commander and that is that.  He has to do what Eidolon says whether or not he agrees with it.  Tarik isn’t entirely satisfied with the answer.

The company’s course of action has been determined, despite Tarik and Eidolon’s inability to get along.  They will use explosives to destroy the giant cement trees to interrupt the shield storms, just like Eidolon did earlier.  Saul, being the obedient and humble soldier that he is, seems perfectly content to let Eidolon get all the credit.  Bulle however, is not (Wait, who is Bulle??).  He attempts to speak up, and against Saul and Lucius’ wishes, Tarik lets him.  Bulle reveals that Saul was the one who blew up the trees.  Tarik now has one more reason to dislike Eidolon, commends Saul for his smarts and tells Lucius if Bulle is punished for speaking, the Warmaster will personally strip Lucius of rank.  Something tells me Lucius is starting to resent Saul.

Now we get to spend some time with Loken who is waiting to be called to assist the companies on Murder.  He and an Astartes named Marr and discussing what the landing party is experiencing.  Marr is jealous  and a little nervous because his twin brother was part of the landing party and he wasn’t.  The two are joined by Qruze, a relic who is weird.  He’s like your old, slightly senile grandfather, that you put up with because you love him, but he has no idea what is going on.  Loken quickly exits the coversation, leaving Marr flailing in a sea of unwanted and dubious advice.

Loken has been reading through The Chronicles of Ursh, the book he borrowed at Sindermann’s recommendation.  He doesn’t seem overly fond of the book, but has continued reading for Sindermann’s sake.  While only half comprehending the book, Loken finds a brief account of the men going crazy and turning on each other, much like what hapened to Jubal at the end of Part 1.  He even finds the word ‘sorcery’ used un-ironically, but the rest of the book makes no further references to this event.

Unnerved, Loken puts the book away and finds a data slate containing picts from Keeler.  He pages through them reflecting on how much he loves the picts.  Despite his apparent habit of pouring over these,  he discovers a hidden folder for the first time.  This folder contains pictures from the Whisperheads, and specifically, necromorphy Jubal.  Loken immediately rushes off to see Keeler, asking Nero to keep him up to date is they are called to go to the planet.

Loken finds Ig, who is losing a game of cards.  Ig takes him to see Keeler in her quarters.  She hasn’t been coping well.  Loken asks her about the picts of Jubal and she says that she put them there hoping he’d find them earlier.  Loken’s kind of dumb, huh.  Keeler didn’t remember taking the picts, but upon reviewing them, she found strange distortions to the images.  Loken didn’t see any of this and after Keeler walks him through a ‘zoom and enhance’ sequence we find there is a ghostly aura that was obscuring Jubal in the pict.  The two are mimicking each other.

Loken offers to find out the truth for Keeler, but she says she’d rather live thinking it was some giant dog-like creature than the truth.  She asks how Loken is able to keep secrets and if he would be willing to break from the Imperium if it was for the good of mankind.  He cannot answer her and their conversation is interrupted by the arrival of Sanguinius.

Chapter 7 jumps back to a week before the arrival of Sanguinius to explain the character of Sanguinius.  Loken is recounting to Sadie a private event at which ten thousand soldiers were in attendance.  These seems to be the first time Loken saw Sanguinius.  Sadie says she’s heard of him and Loken says that it is all true.

Well that’s not vague and unsatisfying.

So Sanguinius shows up and meets Saul, uninteresting things happen and then the what is possibly the most infuriating and idiotic line happens: “We will murder Murder together.”  Who thought that was a good line?!  It punctuates the scene as the turning point and the reason the Imperium goes to war.  As if HORUS just said something incredibly inspiring.

Infuriating dialogue aside, the Imperium wages a 6 month war against the Spider-Mechs.  The Mournival tries to convince HORUS that he is too precious to die in battle, which offends and amuses him.  He is not swayed and fights regardless.  It is revealed that when around the time HORUS became Warmaster, the Emperor wanted someone (it is unclear as to whether this someone was HORUS or a different commander) to change the name of the XVI Legion to The Sons of Horus.

The six month campaign ends when mysterious battleships appear, asking the Imperium: “What the heck dudes!  We totally warned you!” (my words, not theirs).

Well that’s the end of Part 2.  There are four chapters in Part 3.  Once we finish Horus Rising, I will be doing a normal review of False Gods, the second book in the series to give it a fair chance.

This has been Hatchet’s Summer Book Club, thanks for being here! x33

[Pict]

‘Book Club’: Horus Rising Part 2 Chapter 3 Rehash: Oops

Welcome back to Hatchet’s Summer Book Club!  If you’re new, check out the first post in the series ‘Book Club’: Horus Rising Ch. 1-3.

You can find the previous post HERE and the next post HERE (whenever that happens).

When I open up to chapter 4, the first page is on my right, meaning the last page of chapter 3 is on my left.

I may have skipped chapter 3 entirely in my previous post.

Oops.

Let’s fix that shall we?

Loken finds his friend Sinderman in the library reading poetry and fiction to recover from the terrifying necromorph attack.  They discuss the Whisperheads event (which happened NINE WEEKS AGO).  Loken asks Sinderman to review some of the poetry Ig has written as Loken has no idea how poetry works.

I was hoping that since the narrative with Loken picks up at nine weeks after, there would be no description of the mundane things that happened after all that exciting stuff from chapter 9.

I hoped in vain.

Honestly, it’s not that bad, there are some interesting things that happened in the past nine weeks.

Firstly, we get some insight on the relationship dynamics of the Mournival.

Secondly, we discover that Jubal was part of a Lodge, a warrior fraternity, and Loken hates those.  In fact he despises them.  I was only ever an honorary member of a fake frat, so I really have no opinion of them.  While Loken seems to have a personal vendetta against these Lodges, no one else agrees with him.

Thirdly, Iggy is alive.  Somehow.  That’s good for him I guess, I did like him (I like Keeler more, where the heck is she Abnett!!).  Ig is placed on probation since he can’t not tell the truth.  Loken vouches for him, under the conditions that Ig give him copies of all his poetry and ALWAYS tells the truth.

Fourthly, lowercase Horus invites Loken to a LODGE!  Loken says fine.

The end.

This has been Hatchet’s Summer Book Club, thanks for being here! x33

‘Book Club’: Horus Rising Part 2 Chapters 1-3: Here’s the Sitch

Welcome back to Hatchet’s Summer Book Club!  If you’re new, check out the first post in the series ‘Book Club’: Horus Rising Ch. 1-3.

You can find the previous post HERE and the next post HERE.

Alright, so here’s the sitch.

I’m having a hard time reading this book.

I don’t know if it’s because I’m trying to blog while reading or if I just don’t like it.  There are parts and characters that I enjoy, but for the most part, I’ve been purposefully avoiding this.  BUT I WILL CARRY ON!

So part 2.

In chapter 1 of part 2 all that excitement, action, and mystery of those last few chapters comes to a painful grinding halt.  I mean, this book that I had doubts about totally reeled me in those last three chapters, gained my trust, and then dashed my book heart against those stupid grass stalks of Murder.

We are introduced to a new dude, who waxes poetic for quite some time about finding the perfect opponent.  I much prefer his friend who doesn’t care about all that and just wants some action.  (please give me something interesting to read, please).  Their names aren’t important, they just die by the end of chapter 2.

So our new heroes encounter some strange half mechanical/half squishy-red-stuff creatures.  Or rather very dense bone stuff.  These things look like spiders, which is more than enough reason for me to want to destroy them.  These creatures are very tough and kill many nameless Astartes.  I may have missed something, but why aren’t they using giant flame throwers?  Doesn’t everyone know the best way to get rid of spiders is fire?  After a bunch of skirmishes, our now doomed group find what remains of the Blood Angels (they’re dead, bt-dubbs).

Oh yeah, New Dude and Co. were looking for for a company of Astartes called the Blood Angels.  They landed on Murder and promptly died, just like New Dude and Co.  I doubt they’d send anybody else after them.

Shit.

Chapter 3 returns to Loken and his crew, who are en-route to Murder to rescue the hapless crew who was sent to rescue the hapless Blood Angels.  Except no rescuing was happening.  These giant, horse-faced soldiers are so insecure that if they find out a group of their comrades need rescuing they’d be unable to function.  Anywho.  Instead of exploring Murder with Loken, we find out that Ig is alive.

Wait, Ig is alive?  Didn’t he die…like stopped breathing died?  And lost a bunch blood?  And had broken…everything?

Aight, whatever.  So Ig is alive, but also extremely subdued and much less Ig-like.  I guess Sadie called in a favour from Loken who vouched for Ig, and HORUS decided to let Ig stay on the giant ship-country.  However, Ig has to report directly to Loken and give him everything he writes so they can make sure Ig doesn’t say anything that makes the Empire look bad.

Well that was only a little surprising.

I believe that the next post should be on Ch. 4-5, as there are about 7(?) chapters in Part 2.  And then there are four chapters in Part 3 and we’ll be done!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

This has been Hatchet’s Summer Book Club, thanks for being here! x33

[Picture]

‘Books’: Temple of the Dragonslayer by Tim Waggoner

This book is soooooo overdue at the library.

After reading Homeland I got a little nostalgic for Wizards of the Coast books and decided to check out the book that introduced me to the wonderful world of Dragon Lance.  This is the first book in the Spellbinder Quartet which is part of The New Adventures which is simply Dragon Lance for kids (or Dragon Lance without implied sexual antics).

When our story opens we meet Nearra, a young girl who has lost her memory.  Despite this, Nearra is charming and kind and manages to amass quite the crew: a dirty rotten lying scoundrel with a heart of gold named Davyn, a dirty rotten thieving scoundrel elf with a heart of gold named Elidor, a smelly angry Minotaur with a heart of gold named Jax, a self doubting failed page with a heart of gold named Catriona, and a kender lacking any quality associated with common sense but who still has a heart of gold named Sindri.  (whew.  That’s a lot.)  These unlikely friends set out to restore Nearra’s memories, but every step they take is seen by the Black Wizard Maddoc who’s plans can’t seem to go wrong despite constantly going wrong (black as in moon alliance, as the three moons of Kyrnn are what fuel the wizards powers.  Wizards are most powerful at night, especially when their respective moon is at it’s zenith and full.  Maddoc is aligned with the black moon that you can only see if you are aligned with it and I’m really letting my nerd show, aren’t I.  I’ll stop now).

That’s all I’ll say plot wise, so I don’t spoil too much.

I’m pretty sure I read every single one of these New Adventure books in my youth.  There are also several trilogies focusing on various characters.  Elidor was my first elf crush and was the cause of my obsession with ashe blonde hair while in middle school, and I relate to Sindri on a spiritual level as I would probably be so excited to see a dragon I wouldn’t even notice if it ate me.

It’s obvious that these books were written for young adults, but the story is still interesting if somewhat simplistic and spelled out.  It was definitely an excellent introduction point to the world of Krynn.  If you’ve aged out of the YA group, I’d suggest Dragons of an Autumn Twilight instead, but Temple of the Dragon Slayer is a fairly solid YA novel.

This has been According to Hatchet,

Thanks for being here.